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Researcher, teacher and performer in the field of Arts, Technology and Education; Founder and Director of Conductive Music CIC. Experienced in end-to-end delivery of educational projects across the Key Stages, Higher Education and the wider community. Successful fundraiser, effective budget administrator and motivational team leader.

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Teacher, performer and researcher in the field of Education, Music, Culture and the Arts; Ethnomusicologist specialised in Kabuki and Japanese Traditional Music, with whole class and one-to-one teaching experience from early years to undergraduate students.

More resources

Click on the links below to check out their very cool online tutorials.

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Wood joinery | Chagall           Arcimboldo | Janne Lehtinen

Céleste Bousier-Mougenot

National Geographic In focus

Robin Rhodes | Japan meets West | Polly Morgan

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Anselm Kiefer

 
 
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A wildlife walk

and exhibition

12th April - 31st May
Daily

- Free -

Bring your wellies &

binoculars.

Covid restriction

apply, Only one social bubble per time slot.

booking essential.

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The Ensemble

Alexander McQueen | Salvador Dali | Anselm Kiefer | Chagall | Bill Viola | Japan and the West | Escher | Arcimboldo | Fazal Sheikh | Masters of Origami | Toru Takemitsu | David Attenborough | Michael Kenna | Robin Rhodes | Agnest Martin | Polly Morgan | Mark Dion | Céleste Bousier-Mougenot

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In celebration of the Countryside Higher Level Stewardship Scheme we have been meticulously charting bird sightings and songs - identifying 71 species of birds (of which 16 have UK Red Conservation status). 

 

In this our first visual arts exhibition you can delve into a collection of books which showcase visual artists, composers, fashion designers, carpenters, photographers who share our appreciation of birds.

Young birds once they learn to fly after falling and retrying, take off to explore the world and on their journey, they find their soulmate before prospecting to make a home, either in a new location or returning to their point of origin. We– the third generation to care for The HopBarn - are not unlike birds in their life cycle having returned to this [Southwell Farm] after exploring the world. They have built a home and started to sow their dreams and aspirations on the land.

 

So, why not take advantage of this opportunity to delve into our books and take a walk around the farm to see and hear the extraordinary, feathered friends who shape daily life for us at The Hopbarn.  

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Agnes Martin | Salvador Dali | Origami

Toru Takemitsu | David Attenborough

M.C. Escher | Bill Viola | Alexander McQueen           Micheal Kenna | Fazal Sheikh

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Send in your finished postcards or share them on social media by tagging us @the_hopbarn on Instagram. Below are some of your submissions:

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TheHopBarn is collaborating with Conductive Music to bring you STEAM workshops exploring technology and the arts in response to this exhibition. These workshops are an additional educational enrichment for your kids.

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STEAM workshop

Would you like to code a bird game?

upload your game online and share them with your friends?

 

Challenge them!

Age 5 - 8

Age 8 - 12

30-31st of May

Morning / afternoon sessions

Come and book

your slot, limited spaces available.

Let us lead you through a bird coding adventure across the Nottinghamshire skies. Code your own bird video game and upload it to share with or challenge your friends. 

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Whether in music, the performing or visual arts; The HopBarn holds a strong view that experimentation is crucial to any creative development, and that by learning through play without the fear of making mistakes is an integral and necessary part of the creation process.

 

From Thursday 27th to Sunday 30th May 2021, we are delighted that Conductive Music will be in residence at The HopBarn and have offered to deliver a number of workshops to children and young people who wish to explore through 'making, breaking and playing' in order to discover new ideas, skills and learning.

 

Conductive Music offer tailor made workshops using music as a principal medium whilst combining STEAM Subjects to realise the full potential of any learning outcome. The sessions are extremely enjoyable as the children and young people get to interact with varying disciplines and their learning outcomes are heightened immensely from their experience of taking part.

Unfortunately due to the ongoing coronavirus pandemic, the planned workshop with Conductive Music has been postponed until social distance restrictions have been eased. We apologise for any inconvenience caused but we hope that you will understand in view of the current government guidelines.

Conductive Music has created a series of O Momociru projects where storytelling, digital music and video game coding come together! Below is one of their cool O Momociru projects called Tsuna, a story about the struggle of a demon and a samurai. Visit this link to play the game. 

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KIDS

CORNER

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Inspired by Mark Dion’s installation Library for the Birds (2016), The HopBarn invites visitors young and old to draw, paint, sketch, stick and glue their own little book or picture that we can hang on our specially designed miniature tree which will sit alongside the main exhibition.

Drawing inspiration from the installation, the nature walk or just from your favourite book, The HopBarn would like to populate our own library for birds with your thoughts.

 

Contributions can be created at The HopBarn during visits to the exhibition or created at home by downloading a template and posted to us, to be added by the Hopbarn staff.

For activities:

Mark Dion Library for the birds (2016)

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Mark Dion is an American conceptual artist whose work “examines the manner in which prevalent ideologies and institutions influence our understanding of history, knowledge and the natural world.

 

‘Library for the Birds’ has been seen in New York at the Tanya Bonakdar Gallery (2016) and later at the London Whitechapel Gallery (2018).  

 

Inside a large, grand bird cage 600 books are shelved, stacked and displayed around the trunk and branches of a dead tree. The books (various scientific investigations and studies) all relate to the natural world and live birds such as finches, canaries or doves, species that are social and comfortable with human proximity. This installation is one of a series of works called ‘aviary sculpture’ and as the show migrates to different cities, it adapts itself to every new locale by carefully sourcing local books, reflecting that city’s cultural responses to nature. 

 

But dotted around these 600 books are objects that counterbalance the controlling, managing relationship to the natural world found inside these publications: feeding stations that support live birds, deactivated traps once used by hunters. 

 

Ironically of course, all these laborious efforts are ignored by the birds themselves, creatures oblivious to the meaning of such objects. In the artist’s own words “the idea is based on the absurdist conceit of a library for birds. But of course, there are birds defecating on the books, and their indifference to this human knowledge is rather striking.”